Posts

Fibromyalgia’s Link to Cipro Toxicity

Fibromyalgia has been one of those “mystery” ailments that can create tremendous amounts of pain, yet doctors still don’t have a definitive answer as to its cause, nor is there a cure. A wide net has been cast as to possible risk factors, including chronic stress, certain infections, autoimmune disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, traumatic injuries and more, most of which puts pretty much everyone at some level of risk.

The number of people suffering with this life-changing, debilitating condition is growing; today it affects about 10 million people in the US alone and about 6 percent of people worldwide, according to the National Fibromyalgia Association. The chance of being diagnosed with fibromyalgia increases with age—currently 8 percent of people suffer with this disorder by the age of 80.

One other important risk factor associated with developing fibromyalgia that has come to light more recently is the use of a certain class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. While you may not be familiar with the term, you’ve probably heard of Cipro (generic name ciprofloxacin); in fact, chances are you or someone you know has been prescribed Cipro at some time. A common “go to” broad-spectrum antibiotic, Cipro is readily prescribed for UTIs, bronchitis, ear infections, sinusitis, and a wide range of other bacterial infections. Some doctors also prescribe Cipro for infections caused by viruses—viral illnesses don’t respond to antibiotic treatment and shouldn’t be treated with them.

Fluoroquinolones aren’t just associated with fibromyalgia—Baylor College of Medicine reports that these antibiotics have received an FDA black box warning due to the fact that they may “disrupt the normal functions of connective tissue, including tendon rupture, tendonitis, and retinal detachment.” When a drug receives a black box warning—the most serious the FDA can give—doctors are supposed to inform their patients of the warning and the potential harm the drug can cause. However, many doctors are not communicating any of this information to their patients, putting them at risk without their knowing or giving them the opportunity to request a different approach.

In addition to the above side effects, there is concern that there may be a connection between fluoroquinolones and cardiovascular problems as well as “severe aortic problems”, including aneurysms. A 2016 FDA news release states that the potential disabling side effects that may affect joints, the central nervous system and muscles can be permanent, occurring anywhere from hours to weeks after use. (Dangerous side effects can happen after just one dose, as the article in The New York Times illustrates.) It concludes that fluoroquinolones should only be prescribed for serious bacterial infections or when there is no alternative treatment.

While antibiotics definitely have their place in medicine and are necessary to fight certain illnesses and, in some cases, can save people’s lives, the problem is that Cipro use should be limited to more powerful bacterial strains, including life-threatening infections. As reported in The New York Times, University of British Columbia pharmacological epidemiologist Mahyar Etminan stated that fluoroquinolones are being overprescribed “by lazy doctors who are trying to kill a fly with an automatic weapon.” In fact, the Drug Law Center reports that over 26 million people are prescribed fluoroquinolones annually.

Many common viral and bacterial infections can clear up on their own with proper care; you can help your body fight back by increasing your intake of “natural antibiotic” foods, such as manuka honey, cinnamon, garlic, foods rich in vitamin C and more. If necessary, safer, less powerful medications can be prescribed. Of course, the best treatment is prevention, which means strengthening your immune system and maintaining a healthy gut microbiome.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Is Psoriasis Reversible?

Anyone who has psoriasis knows the discomfort it can cause—itching, burning, stinging, soreness. It can even prevent some people from participating in the social activities they enjoy if they’re uncomfortable being seen in public with the telltale raised red patches, sometimes with silverish-white scales on their skin.

Psoriasis can be confused with eczema because the two share some symptoms, but there are a couple of symptoms that can set psoriasis apart—stiff, swollen joints and patches of inflamed redness. People can be genetically predisposed to contracting psoriasis if one or especially both parents suffer from it, but it can also arise from environmental triggers.

At its core, psoriasis is an autoimmune disease; it’s an immune system response in which the body’s T cells that normally protect it against disease go awry and start attacking healthy skin cells. This, in turn, triggers other immune responses, creating more severe reactions.

Flare-ups can last from weeks to months and can be cyclical; outbreaks can range from mild to severe, showing up in small spots or spreading over large areas. Some of the most common triggers are chronic stress, obesity, food allergies or sensitivities, medications, drying environmental conditions, infections, over-consumption of alcohol, and smoking.

The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) states that there are five different types of psoriasis, ranging from common to rare: plaque (most common type), guttate, inverse, pustular, and erythrodermic (rare and most severe; can become life-threatening). Each type presents with a different appearance and usually shows up in specific areas of the head and body, but flare-ups can occur anywhere.

There are further risks to having psoriasis, and among them is the possibility of developing psoriatic arthritis, a debilitating condition marked by inflammation, pain, and progressive joint damage. The NPF estimates that approximately 30 percent of people with psoriasis will be diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. If left untreated, psoriatic arthritis can cause permanent joint damage; in addition, more than 30 percent of patients with psoriatic arthritis developed hearing loss, and more than 26 percent had inner ear damage.

Other possible serious health conditions that could arise from having psoriasis include cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, Crohn’s disease, kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, osteoporosis, depression, diabetes and more. The NPF states that there is a “significant association between psoriatic disease and metabolic syndrome”, which includes several health issues like heart disease, high blood pressure and abdominal obesity; approximately 40 percent of psoriasis patients develop metabolic syndrome.

Dermatologists typically treat psoriasis with topical creams and moisturizers in an effort to minimize discomfort and lessen the appearance of flare-ups; they may also use phototherapy or prescribe immune-suppressing medications. However, these creams and medications merely suppress the symptoms to some degree—and many have dangerous side effects that can lead to new serious health issues.

While conventional medicine looks to suppress the immune system, functional medicine works to strengthen it. Specialists like dermatologists, endocrinologists and others focus only on the affected organ system of their specialty rather than the whole person; therefore, if the root of the condition stems from a different part of the body or another undetected disorder, it will remain overlooked and the problem continues…and usually worsens.

As with any autoimmune disease, there is an underlying cause that goes far deeper than the skin reactions you see on the surface. And the only way to truly manage any autoimmune disease, including psoriasis, so that you don’t have to endure the constant cyclical flare-ups is to find out why your immune system has become confused enough to attack healthy tissue. Standard blood, urine, and other tests don’t dig deep enough to unearth the real problem, but your functional medicine doctor will conduct extremely comprehensive tests to reach the “why” of your psoriasis.

The answer to reversing or preventing your psoriasis—or any health issue—from progressing further lies in finding both the root cause and your specific triggers. Everyone’s triggers are different, and there can be a combination of culprits including food sensitivities or allergies, stress, environmental toxins, nutritional deficiencies, undiscovered infections, genetic factors, leaky gut and others. Through a correct diagnosis of the true cause of your psoriasis, proper lifestyle changes will help to heal the source—which not only helps your skin, but can also prevent other health issues from developing.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Inflammation May Cause Brain Disorders

Here’s What You Can Do…

Chronic inflammation is at the root of a myriad health problems, from arthritis and heart disease to Crohn’s disease and cancer. Now a new study published in Neurology shows that inflammation in midlife may lead to brain shrinkage and brain disorders in later life.

This study followed 1,633 participants for a period of 24 years; when these volunteers reached the age of 77, scientists measured their brain volume using MRI scans. They discovered that those who had a higher number of inflammatory markers in their 40s and 50s now had lower performance scores on word memorization tests than those with lower inflammation. Significantly, the scans also showed that there was less volume in certain areas of the brain – particularly those (such as the hippocampus) that are related to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The takeaway from this study is that people who have higher chronic inflammation markers in midlife may be at higher risk for degenerative brain diseases than those who do not.

Likewise, inflammation is also at the root of other brain issues such as depression, anxiety, and brain fog (among other things). As reported by Fortune magazine in October 2017, the number of people globally who suffer from depression is staggering at over 300 million, and 260 million are suffering with anxiety disorders. While there are, of course, other medical and/or psychological reasons for some of these brain disorders, inflammation may still account for the underlying cause itself, whether in part or wholly.

Brain fog, considered a cognitive dysfunction, can impact daily life and ranges in its level of severity, from annoying to severe. Symptoms include fatigue, lack of focus, poor memory, confusion, difficulty in putting words together and other such things. While many people put these symptoms off to things like aging or “just part of life”, they aren’t something to be ignored or laughed off and accepted. Brain fog is your brain’s way of telling you that something needs to be corrected, just like pain, nausea or other symptoms are your body’s way of letting you know something is wrong.

Medications can also cause brain fog, but the answer is not to add yet another medication in order to counteract the effects of the one(s) causing the problem. Fortunately, there are easy ways to reduce or avoid inflammation without prescription or OTC medications. A couple of major contributors to inflammation are sugar and processed or packaged foods. Not only do they cause inflammation on their own, but if they make up a good portion of your diet, you can also become deficient in some vitamins and minerals that are important to both physical and mental health. Processed foods contain excessive amounts of sodium, sugars, and a host of chemicals that can damage your health in many different ways. And supplements alone aren’t enough to make up for any of that.

You can start lowering your inflammation level by replacing refined sugars and processed or packaged foods with whole foods (organic is always best, if possible). Some good choices include these “brain foods”:

  • fatty fish
  • nuts
  • coconut and olive oils
  • seeds
  • avocado

Antioxidant-rich foods, teas and spices are also a great benefit and are easy to incorporate into your diet, such as:

  • berries
  • turmeric
  • cumin
  • oregano
  • cinnamon
  • white, green and black teas

And there are many more. Your functional medicine doctor can give you comprehensive testing to detect any food sensitivities or allergies you may not realize you have, which can cause inflammation as well as leaky gut syndrome.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Vitamin D Deficiencies in Seniors

You may already know that vitamin D deficiencies have become increasingly common in recent years, especially since more people of all ages are spending larger amounts of time indoors. But what you may not know is that seniors have an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency, not only because they may not be as inclined toward outdoor activities, but also because their bodies can’t synthesize vitamin D from sunlight as efficiently as people under the age of 50. This deficiency has become so prevalent, The International Society for Clinical Densitometry has called it “the silent epidemic of the elderly”.

There are a number of signs of vitamin D deficiency that shouldn’t be ignored, including:

  • muscle weakness
  • mobility problems
  • fatigue
  • chronic gut issues such as IBS
  • moodiness
  • weight gain
  • weakened immune system

A study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism states that at least 70 percent of seniors aged 65 to 88 have at least one physical limitation due to a vitamin D deficiency and are likely to experience further functional decline.

Unfortunately, too many people push off symptoms like this to “normal aging” and just accept the symptoms rather than bringing them to their doctor’s attention. However, not all doctors will check vitamin D levels unless requested and instead may automatically prescribe an unnecessary medication for the symptom. This, of course, will either help only for a short period or won’t help at all, and new health issues may arise from the medications.

Vitamin D is a necessary catalyst for serotonin production, the “feel good” brain hormone that affects our moods. A serotonin-deficient person could experience depression, mania and become prone to Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), all of which are typically treated with dangerous psychiatric medications. Low vitamin D levels can also weaken the immune system and create an overall hormonal imbalance resulting in low brain serotonin and high gut serotonin production.

Proper vitamin D levels offer these protections as well as others:

  • maintain bone density
  • lower risk of heart disease, some cancers and diabetes
  • mobility maintenance
  • strengthened immunity
  • fall and fracture prevention
  • maintain independent lifestyle
  • lessen risk of Parkinson’s disease

Besides natural sunlight, certain foods contain higher levels of vitamin D; these include fatty fish (choose fish that are lower in mercury such as salmon, sardines, anchovies and trout, among others), egg yolks, almond milk fortified with vitamin D, cheese and beef liver.

It’s important at any age to know your vitamin D level, and it’s just as important to know how much vitamin D supplementation you should take, if any. Each person’s levels are different, depending on the foods they eat, their time spent outdoors, and more; too much of anything can be just as bad as not enough. Only through comprehensive individualized testing can the proper levels of vitamin D be reached and maintained for optimal health.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Is Heartburn and GERD Medication Really Safe?

At some point, most people experience the uncomfortable feeling of heartburn. While heartburn is typically associated with a burning feeling in the chest and/or throat, there are other symptoms that can be experienced as well, including difficulty swallowing, chest and/or back pain, chronic hoarseness or cough, sore throat or the feeling of food getting caught in the throat.

Heartburn is caused by stomach acid that is released into the esophagus when the LES (lower esophageal sphincter) muscular valve malfunctions and allows stomach acid to flow back into the esophagus, causing irritation and that all-too-common burning feeling. This discomfort can last from a few minutes to hours and can interfere with sleep, focus and activities, so to get immediate relief, most people automatically reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) heartburn medication.

There are a number of things that can trigger heartburn, and it can be different for everyone. Individual triggers can include overeating, food with high acid content, smoking, caffeine, onions, alcohol, food allergies and other things. Unfortunately, heartburn has become so commonplace that most people don’t realize it’s a symptom and not a normal part of life.

Because OTC relief can easily be found through seemingly harmless antacids like Tums, Alka-Seltzer and Mylanta as well as formerly prescription-only PPIs (proton pump inhibitors) like Nexium, Prevacid, Zantac and Prilosec, they’re thought of as safe “go-to” ways of preventing or relieving heartburn. This couldn’t be further from the truth – heartburn medication, including non-prescription types, come with their own set of health risks, especially for chronic users. Known health risks include:

  • acute kidney injury (AKI)
  • chronic kidney disease (CKD)
  • vitamin B12 or magnesium deficiency
  • higher risk of certain bacterial infections, bone fractures, osteoporosis, pneumonia, dementia, heart problems
  • reduction in calcium absorption

Approximately 20 million Americans take PPIs for mild to moderate heartburn, but PPIs weren’t originally intended for that. Instead, PPIs were created to treat more serious physician-diagnosed ailments like esophageal damage caused by severe acid reflux, bleeding ulcers and a few other extreme issues. It’s estimated that over 90 percent of patients prescribed PPIs do not have health issues requiring their use. However, long-term users of PPIs need to be weaned off them; stopping use suddenly can cause serious withdrawal symptoms such as severe stomach pain and hyperacidity.

Occasional heartburn is one thing, but persistent heartburn, called GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), can lead to esophageal cancer and may be a symptom of an underlying health issue like an H. pylori imbalance or too little stomach acid. Doctors typically prescribe PPIs to patients with GERD in an attempt to lessen the symptoms, thereby temporarily restoring their quality of life and possibly reducing the risk of esophageal cancer. However, this is only treating the symptom; it’s far more important to diagnose and heal the underlying cause of GERD. If an insufficient amount of stomach acid is being produced, patients are prone to even more serious conditions such as food poisoning, infections of the digestive system and nutritional deficiencies.

Rather than taking medications to alleviate heartburn, a better strategy is to prevent heartburn through dietary changes, adding or increasing probiotics or adding certain supplements to improve digestion. By restoring gut health and eliminating your personal triggers, you can end heartburn safely and naturally while improving your immune system, microbiome and overall health.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

When Just Getting Old Means Something is Wrong

In her article “Tired? Weak? You’re not ‘just getting old’; something is wrong”, author Judith Graham, Kaiser Health News, described symptoms such as fatigue, weakness and depression as the to-be-expected signs of normal aging for too many adults. Unfortunately, societal assumptions and cultural norms about what it means to ‘get old’ have gotten in the way of proper treatment. Indeed, peoples’ bodies gradually change as they age, but there are also common concerns that should garner attention and a thorough clinical workup.

Graham insists that symptoms like appetite loss and depression should be addressed by a doctor, particularly when they interfere with a patient’s mobility or cause a sense of isolation. Overlooked in Ms. Graham’s article are common symptoms like chronic pain, fear of falling and brain fog, indicative of blood sugar dysregulation, thyroid toxicity and medication side effects, which debilitate many patients.

Muscle wasting, irritability and fatigue. Our bodies hаvе a desperate nееd fоr sugar (glucose),as it iѕ thе fuеl that gives our ɫеllѕ the energy they need tо kееɪ us alive. Problems begin tо occur then thе ongoing supply of simple sugars in the blood stream (and оur bоdу’ѕ ability tо uѕhеr it intо the cells with insulin) is disrupted.

With a notable drop in blood sugar, such as in the morning and before breakfast, low blood sugar will cause sudden irritability and, by midday, dizziness and fear of falling. How well a patient can stabilize blood sugar into old age is a good predictor of healthy aging. Balance disorders, seizures, ischemic attacks, Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s all can be exacerbated and/or masked by inability to control blood sugar and insulin as we age.

Mental fogginess and constipation. Thyroid hormones govern metabolism and even though a slowdown in thyroid activity can be expected as the decades pass, extreme fatigue, gut problems, loss of bone density, constipation and mental fogginess are all indicators that something is wrong.

As people age they become more susceptible to autoimmune disease that progresses from one target tissue to the next like wildfire. So, a thyroid disorder such as Hashimoto’s can progress to cerebellar ataxia in the brain, rheumatoid arthritis in the joints, or celiac disease in the gut. An easy way to stop the madness is by altering the diet and providing additional nutrients that also reduce inflammation and heal various target tissues.

Chronic pain. Statins, antibiotics, NSAIDs, blood thinners, high blood pressure pills, opiates, and soon all have side effects. Muscle weakness, gut problems, thin skin, bruising, skin outbreaks, disorientation and worsening pain should all be cross-checked with the medications that are being prescribed. In many cases, two or more medications are being prescribed for the exact same reason. Worse, many drugs cause severe discomfort and can become addictive to patients.

In past decades, natural healthcare experts who’ve sounded the alarm about the apparent role of medications in causing pain, muscle weakness and heart disease have usually had their arguments drowned out by peers whose research was funded by the pharmaceutical industry and related groups. To combat the signs of old age, re-examine lifestyle and diet, and get checked by a qualified functional doctor.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Thyroid, Electrical Hypersensitivity and Grounding

Next to diabetes, a sluggish thyroid (or hypothyroidism) is the most common endocrine disorder in the United States. It is perceived as a so-called lifestyle disease, meaning that lifestyle choices are equally to blame and needed to correct the problem. And whereas millions of dollars are spent annually to research and develop pharmaceuticals to manage the symptoms of diabetes and to make the public aware of the complications of diabetes, the same is not true for thyroid.

The thyroid gland’s small size belies its enormous importance in regulating your metabolism. If the production of thyroid hormone slows down, you’re likely to gain 5 to 10 extra pounds (or more). The general symptoms include constipation, depression, dry skin, fatigue, hair loss, intolerance to cold, muscle cramps, and slow heart rate. More to the point, and often overlooked, is that symptoms are comprehensive and affect all systems of the body: neurological (e.g. brain fog and depression), vascular (e.g. slow heart rate and intolerance to cold), ophthalmological (e.g. blurred vision), gastrointestinal (e.g. constipation), and so on.

I have long suspected that the flood of changing environmental exposures over the past generation has contributed to the dramatic increase in both hypo- and hyperthyroidism. More of my patients today suffer with thyroid problems than ever before. Industrialization and the introduction of plastics and other synthetic materials have not only disconnected us from the Earth, they showered us with chemicals that our immune systems cannot tolerate. Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors.

For the past 50 years or so, we’ve added carpets, plastics, synthetic-soled shoes, and athletic sneakers, all serving as nonconductive barriers between the Earth and us. If you’ve ever shocked yourself after walking across a carpeted floor, then you know that your body is a conductor. Why is this important? When you are ungrounded, electric fields are attracted to your body and create a surface charge—a voltage. Thyroid sufferers, as you probably know, have an already weakened immune system and are vulnerable to both Multiple Chemical Sensitivity and Electric Hypersensitivity, each of which is born out of this changing environmental pattern over the past 50 years.

The most important time to be grounded is while you’re sleeping. There are two reasons for this. First, the average bedroom typically contains more electrical noise than any other room in a house, especially near where your head rests on your bed. You’ve probably got a tangle of wires behind the wall, as well as wires running under the floor if you’re in an upstairs bedroom. Second, you spend a third of your life lying there. This is the time when your body should be repairing and regenerating, and electrical noise interferes with this process, potentially causing chronic stress and inflammation.

With continued exposure to dirty electricity people get progressively worse. Most sufferers tend to be women, often over 40, and symptoms tend to worsen over time with continued exposure to environmental factors. The issues of grounding and heavy metal toxicity in relation to electrical hypersensitivity may be one of the most significant. The more your system is contaminated with heavy metals, particularly your thyroid, whether from silver amalgam fillings, eating contaminated fish, living downstream from coal-burning power plants and so forth, the more your body becomes a virtual antenna that actually concentrates radiation, making it far more destructive.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

High Blood Pressure, Lipid Abnormalities and Thyroid Disease

In a 2010 clinical abstract posted to PubMed and originally published in the Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, researchers concluded that hypothyroidism should be recognized as a cause of secondary hypertension. This acknowledgement was based on a prior 2007 study in which 100 individuals who were recently diagnosed for hypothyroidism and who had never been treated before with antihypertensive treatment or received drugs for hypothyroidism demonstrated elevated blood pressure values.

All participants underwent around-the-clock “ambulatory” blood pressure monitoring, meaning that blood pressure was monitored at all levels of activity throughout a 24-hour day. The control group consisted of 100 healthy volunteers matched to hypothyroid patients of the same gender and age. Clinical systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism compared to the blood pressure of volunteers.

Based on the findings, the researchers were able to conclude that hypothyroidism may be an important predictor of cardiovascular target organ damage. Specifically, elevated blood pressure values include a higher mean 24-h systolic blood pressure, 24-h pulse pressure, and 24-h systolic blood pressure variability. Lastly, serum cholesterol tended to be marginally higher in patients with hypothyroidism compared with volunteers, while fasting serum triglycerides were significantly higher.

Lipid abnormalities, or dyslipidemia, are common findings in patients with thyroid disease. This is explained by the effects of thyroid hormones in nearly all steps of lipid metabolism.  For instance, total and LDL cholesterol (less often HDL cholesterol), triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein B can each be affected. Many of my patients have been asked by their doctors to do extensive testing for cardiovascular disease, and are often told to begin taking statins (and blood pressure medications) based on the results. But, as the research would indicate, thyroid is a critical component.

Thyroid hormones regulate the expression of enzymes involved in all steps of lipid metabolism. Lipoproteins themselves prevent infections, protect against toxins and inflammation. The most common underlying reasons for dyslipidemia are chronic inflammation, immune dysfunction, and oxidative stress of the vascular system. The underlying lesson is that lipid abnormalities coexist with other metabolic abnormalities, including, hypertension, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress, all of them being risk factors for cardiovascular disease. And, as is probably already evident to thyroid sufferers, the same root causes (chronic infections, accumulation of toxins such as heavy metals, POPs, etc, and chronic inflammatory reactions to foods) will cause negative vascular response.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

How Serious is My PN Pain?

We’ve talked a lot about nerve pain as a serious warning sign of disease. Tingling or burning in the arms and legs may be an early sign of nerve damage. Nerve damage can affect a single nerve or a group of nerves as well as the whole body. Diabetes is the most common cause of this type of nerve problem. It’s an indicator of high blood sugar and poor insulin response, which leads to nerve cell death and other equally serious complications.

People with nerve problems often have difficulty digesting food. They feel full and experience heartburn after eating only a little food. All too often they are taking one or more over-the-counter medications for acid reflux and bloating, not realizing that the unchecked nerve damage is related. For some, it deeply affects the digestive system resulting in the involuntary vomiting of food that has not been digested well. For others, it creates problems with swallowing or problems of waste elimination and the ability to clear the bowels.

These two problems (digestive problems and nerve pain) are related. Nerve damage causes problems with body organs and their ability to function. Another example of this is feeling lightheaded or fainting upon standing. There are several possible root causes of this, including unstable blood sugar, poor blood pressure, or weak adrenal gland response. But another primary cause is that the nerves to the heart are weak. Angina is the term used to describe the chest pain warning sign prior to a heart attack. Nerve damage can hide this warning sign. Sudden fatigue, sweating, shortness of breath, nausea, and vomiting (sympathetic responses) are warning signs as well.

Over-the-counter treatments for nerve pain include topical painkillers, pharmaceutical painkillers, and nutritional supplements. Topical painkillers include creams and ointments with ingredients that work as a local anesthetic, numbing the pain in the area where you apply them. An obvious disadvantage of topical treatments is that you apply them externally, never at the source. Some people with neuropathic pain turn to familiar over-the-counter painkillers like acetaminophenaspirin, and ibuprofen. With mild, sporadic and very occasional pain, they decrease inflammation enough to reduce pain. With chronic pain, they’re useless. There’s also a risk that one might begin to rely on these medicines too much. According to the American Academy of Pain Medicine, prescription painkillers are considered a major contributor to the total number of drug deaths. In 2007, for example, nearly 28,000 Americans died from unintentional drug poisoning, and of these, nearly 12,000 involved prescription pain relievers.

To really get at the cause of nerve pain, we have to look at several factors. Is there an oxygen deficit that is causing the brain to panic? Healthy red blood cells that carry oxygen and keep nerve cells healthy are in short supply. The most common cause of pernicious anemia is the loss of stomach cells that make intrinsic factor, which itself helps the body absorb vitamin B12 into the intestine. Is there a chronic liver infection or kidney disease? The main function of these organs is to remove wastes and excess water and filter the blood stream. Is there an underlying autoimmune condition such as lupus or Hashimoto’s? Poisoning due to heavy metals, such as lead? Or an unwanted side effect of high blood pressure meds?

Only after determining the root cause of your nerve pain can the proper course of healing – not just covering symptoms – begin.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Statins, Neuropathic Pain and Cholesterol

As far back as 1992 a scholarly look into the actual research on statin drug use and heart disease, which had previously claimed that lowering cholesterol would prevent heart disease, determined instead that this claim was wrong. It found that lowering serum cholesterol concentrations does not reduce mortality and is unlikely to prevent chronic heart disease at all. Then in 2012 the FDA began requiring statin manufacturers to add “memory loss” as a side effect of this chemical class of drugs. Now, a study in the Journal of Diabetes reveals a clear association between statin drug use and nerve damage, or peripheral nerve pain.

The central nervous system is the brain and the spinal cord. It branches out to all “peripheral” parts of the body such as the arms, hands, and fingertips…likewise, to the legs, feet, and toes. It is this system that provides all the sensory input from the fingertips and toes back to the brain. It is also the communication pathway throughout the body that allows for movement. What this means is that if you are experiencing pain, numbness or burning in the hands or feet, you have a short circuit between the central and peripheral nervous systems and a lack of sensory input to the brain. To preserve itself, the brain will begin to shut down the communication pathways to the peripheral systems, causing them to atrophy, sting, and hurt as the nerve roots demyelinate.

Peripheral neuropathy is the term for demyelination, which disrupts the body’s ability to enervate muscles, joints, and internal organs. The four cardinal patterns of peripheral neuropathy are polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, and autonomic neuropathy. The most common condition, symmetrical peripheral neuropathy, mainly affects the sensory fibers of the feet and legs, and results in stabbing, sharp electric pain, burning, cramping, numbness, extreme prickling, or an inability to determine joint position. For many neuropathies, the sensation begins in the feet and creeps up the legs toward the center of the body as the condition worsens.

In fact, people who have Type II Diabetes have the same risk of heart attack and dying from heart disease as people who already have had heart attacks. Diabetes is a common cause for sensory neuropathy, though many cases are identified as “idiopathic”, since no direct causal relationship can be found. This ignores the known side effects of cholesterol lowering medications as much as it ignores what we know about the human body and how it operates. Guess what? Cholesterol makes up the largest portion of the myelin nerve sheath (the nerve strand, so to speak) and once you start removing it from the veins and arteries in an effort to lower total serum cholesterol in the bloodstream, the nerve strand begins to irritate. The raw nerve ends cause the pain symptoms until the nerve shrinks and atrophy (or nerve death) sets in. When left untreated, atrophy can result in amputation of a limb.

It turns out that cholesterol is not just a number on a lab test. It’s a reflection of antioxidant levels and inflammatory processes happening within vasculature and nervous systems. Even then, few people need to worry about cholesterol so much as they need worry about actual peripheral nerve pain. Blood cholesterol levels between 200 and 240 mg/dl are normal. These levels have always been normal. In older women, serum cholesterol levels greatly above these numbers have been shown to be associated with longevity. Since 1984, however, in the United States and other parts of the western world, these normal numbers have been treated as if they were an indication of a disease in progress or a potential for disease in the future.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.