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Endocrine Disruptors: What They Are and How to Lower Your Exposure

Our endocrine system is like the main cog in a complex network of machinery; it’s a collection of hormone-producing glands that regulate so many things, from metabolism, reproduction, and sleep to mood, tissue function, and growth and development, just for starters. Keeping your endocrine system healthy is at the root of maintaining optimal functionality of just about every cell and organ in your body.

But our endocrine system is under increasing and constant attack from numerous endocrine disruptors, including:

  • plastics
  • canned foods
  • fragrances
  • pesticides
  • cleaning products
  • cosmetics
  • herbicides
  • fire retardants
  • children’s costume jewelry and toys

These common products frequently contain chemicals that interfere with or mimic your body’s hormonal functions. When this happens to a baby in utero or to an infant or young child, their development and growth can be negatively impacted. In both children and adults, endocrine-disrupting chemicals – even in small amounts – can cause or lead to:

  • neurological changes
  • behavioral changes
  • obesity
  • type 2 diabetes
  • low birth weight
  • weakened immune system
  • disrupted thyroid function
  • cancer
  • reproductive system problems

These are just some of the possible outcomes from exposure to endocrine disruptors. According to the EWG (Environmental Working Group), six of the twelve worst hormone disruptors are:

Chemical
BPA (bisphenol A)
Phthalates
Atrazine
PFCs (Perfluorinated chemicals)
Organophosphate pesticides
Mercury
Commonly In
Canned foods; some plastics; register receipts (coating)
Plastic food containers & wraps; kids’ toys; fragrance
Produce, mainly corn; drinking water
Non-stick pans; water-resistant clothing, carpets, furniture
Fruits and vegetables
Seafood


The other six worst hormone disrupting chemicals on EWG’s list are arsenic, flame retardants, glycol ethers, lead and perchlorate. This is by no means an exhaustive list of endocrine disruptors or the products they’re used in, but it’s a start and gives you a good idea of how many everyday products contain these dangerous chemicals.

The good news is that there are plenty of ways you can greatly minimize your exposure to these toxic chemicals. Buy organic produce, avoid farm-raised seafood and opt for wild-caught (large salt-water fish like tuna, swordfish, mackerel, orange roughy and others have higher amounts of mercury, even if wild-caught), steer clear of fragranced products (laundry and dish detergents, soaps, personal care products, etc.) and antibacterial soaps, replace plastic food storage containers with glass, choose fresh foods over canned, and make your own household cleaning products or check the EWG website for safer commercial products.

There’s a lot you can do to strengthen your endocrine system or balance your hormones naturally, like getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding sugars and refined carbohydrates, getting the right amount of iodine in your diet (or through high-quality supplements) to prevent thyroid problems, including a good balance of fruit and veggies in your diet, and reducing stress in your life. Your functional medicine doctor can pinpoint exactly what your individual needs are in order to keep your hormones and your overall health in good balance.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Clinical Pearls in Functional Endocrinology

Many of us are likely aware that hormone imbalances can contribute to many health complications. The logical next step is to have hormone levels checked and get them balanced. Sounds easy, but is it? Many people have gone to doctors and naturopaths who have attempted to their normalize hormone levels, only to find it is a game of whack-a-mole at best.

For those who have tried balancing hormones and found it to be an impossible task, the chances are that something significant is being overlooked. From hormone delivery methods to testing procedures and supplemental nutritional support, all aspects of hormone adjustments can be tweaked for maximum success.

Here are 6 pearls of clinical wisdom to help guide us down the challenging path towards optimal hormonal balance.

Pearl No. 1 – Hormone Delivery

Typically, effective hormone supplementation, especially progesterone and testosterone, are delivered either topically (creams) or sublingually (oil or alcohol based liquid solutions placed under the tongue). One potential drawback of creams—particularly for menopausal women—is that chronic use of hormone creams can lead to tissue saturation, thereby rendering them ineffective.

Pearl No. 2 – Repeat Testing

It is all too common to hear of doctors prescribing hormone creams or capsules but failing to run repeat tests soon enough, if ever, to monitor the effectiveness of a particular course of treatment. Regular follow-ups are essential because testing will show whether the regimen is balancing hormones in the right direct. Clinical success depends on monitoring the results and taking action every 8 to 12 weeks in the beginning.

Pearl No. 3 – Testing Methods

Many doctors will run blood tests to measure reproductive hormone levels; however, this is not necessarily the best approach. A better approach is salivary hormone testing that measures the free fractionated forms of each hormone so that it is possible to tell what amount of hormones is not just in the bloodstream, but actually available to cells and used.

Pearl No. 4 – Root Cause Investigation

What is “functional endocrinology”? While everyone agrees it is important to achieve hormonal balance in order to feel well, only a functional endocrinologist will inquire about the root cause of any imbalances present.

Supplementing hormones is by trial and through follow up, and with a comprehensive look at everything going on. There is a reason why a hormone imbalance is present in the first place, and we want to understand what that reason is.

Culprits include compromised adrenal function, blood sugar regulation, hormone receptor saturation, inflammation and brain-body communication. Administering hormones without addressing these root cause issues won’t work.

Pearl No. 5 – Supplement Overload

There are articles and advertisements all over the media touting the health benefits of new supplements and the latest products. However, consumers are mostly in the dark regarding what supplementation their body needs. Add to this a problem with product authenticity, harmful fillers, and potency. It is imperative to have a doctor prescribe high quality, all-natural, pre-screened products on a regimen tailored to an individual’s needs.

Pearl No. 6 – Hormone Clearance

An often overlooked but potent aspect to hormone balance is bile synthesis and clearance of excess saturation from the body. The liver must be supported to aid the body in pushing out excess hormones. Sometimes it is not only adding in hormones, but often pushing excess hormones out that can be key.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

A Healing Mindset for Curing What Ails

Medicine has its place in a moment of crisis. For instance, when you’ve been working way too hard and the pressures are mounting. You have what feels like a heart attack but it’s determined to be a panic attack instead. Medications are then given to relieve anxiety and to prevent future heart-related events. In an acute scenario like this, I fully support it. If your house is on fire, you want to call the fire department, not a medical detective.

Sometimes a quick intervention is warranted to quell the emergency. You take medications long enough to implement changes in your life that are beneficial. If your health keeps deteriorating and you continue to come down with mysterious ailments, you want an investigator. You want a Columbo of sorts to keep asking the pointed questions.

And since it’s your life and you live it all day every day, you also want to get to the root of the problem and take care of as much of it as you can yourself. This is what I call a Healing Mindset, and here are the shifts involved in achieving that mindset:

Shift No. 1. From Affliction to Conviction – Shift your headspace from a feeling of affliction to one of conviction about what it will take to get better. Look at the whole picture, and connect the dots as you realize that your health problem did not happen overnight. This is not about a lightning bolt coming out of the sky; it’s about a conscious examination.

Shift No. 2. From Helpless to Accountable – To become personally responsible for changes that had to occur in your life, you must hold yourself accountable for what went wrong, and also for what is going right. Look at your relationships, your wellbeing and your happiness. Chronic does not mean irreversible, and it does not imply hopeless. What it means is that you have to learn new habits and put them into practice immediately for your own benefit, holding yourself accountable for your own aches and pains.

Shift No. 3. From Passive to Interactive – A typical doctor-patient interaction lasts about 4 to 7 minutes and is rife with mishaps. Communication flows in a one-way direction, if at all, often because the doctor is pressed for time and has only a limited set of options: referral slips, prescriptions and other critical time-saving devices. To truly get well, you have to find an expert, someone you can learn from and who will participate in your treatment. Find a doctor who’s a healing partner, someone you can trust for exceptional advice and insight.

Shift No. 4. From Cured to Recovering – For most of us, there is no such thing as “cured.” True healing is not something that occurs only over a set period of time. Like alcoholism, the illness is never truly gone. Instead, we are Recovering. We will heal ourselves for the rest of our lives, living in recovery so that we preserve the good moments and minimize the setbacks.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Thyroid and Low Metabolic Energy

Are you often tired and worn out? Do you have problems with your weight? Is your skin dry and hair falling out? Do you have difficulty sleeping? Do you feel cold all the time, like you can’t warm up? Is your memory not what it used to be?

If the answer to any of the above is “yes,” but you think it’s just something you have to live with–think again. While all of the above seem like nothing more than day-to-day annoyances, in reality they are all symptoms of low metabolic energy.

So what is “low metabolic energy, and what can you do about it? You are likely familiar with the term “metabolism” and you are also aware that people with an active metabolism (from working out, lifting weights, eating well) seem to have a lot of energy. This is because exercise circulates the blood, transporting oxygen to the brain, passing through the thyroid to deliver fuel and hormones to the cells, thereby enabling all your organs and body systems to function at peak capacity.

If, however, you are under stress, you eat a poor diet, you have an infection, or a host of other causes, all of those bodily functions will be compromised. You will have trouble manufacturing metabolic energy because your blood isn’t circulating through the thyroid, gathering the hormones that turn on the energy (ATP)-making mechanisms inside your cells.

Without that ATP, your body systems stop functioning the way they should. The result can be hormone imbalances, cellular degeneration, chronic inflammation, elimination problems, emotion and sleep disturbances, as well as stressed organs, which together result in a wide range of seemingly inexplicable and unpleasant symptoms such as those cited above.

Restoring metabolic energy helps the body help itself. Some of this is accomplished through dietary changes and nutritional supplementation. We layer in products to support recharging the mitochondria, which are the individual energy packs in each of your cells. And because the thyroid is a target site for toxins, we want to reduce further exposure and help to mobilize existing detoxification pathways. These include clearing out the liver and the gall bladder that become overloaded with excess hormones like estrogen and chemical residues from medications and pesticides. Foremost, we want to address underlying infections that trigger your thyroid to go awry.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Subtle Complexities of Your Thyroid and How It Functions

As mentioned in this series, the thyroid is the primary driver of metabolic function. Metabolism is your body’s ability to produce energy efficiently using the wide array of nutrients and enzymes available, and eliminate wastes. People who suffer with thyroid disorders, particularly hypothyroid, suffer a great number of debilitating side effects. Some of these are visible (hair loss, thinning eyebrows), others affect physical and mental stamina (low energy, brain fog), and still others are more insidious as the body simply fails to perform essential tasks (eliminate wastes and toxic byproducts).

Because the standard of care for anyone with low thyroid is to take replacement hormones, discussions about thyroid routinely focus on how well the drug is affecting your labs, by throwing around terms like TSH, or how well the T4s are converting to T3s, or whether the Reverse T3 is actually a better tool for measuring thyroid function, and so on. Who among you really know what these are! It’s as if the whole problem of low thyroid is a mathematical formula! It’s such confusing terminology that what is lost in the process, and is the reason why the thyroid is completely misunderstood and mismanaged is this: You can’t resolve a thyroid problem by studying the details of a laboratory test.

Hypothyroid issues, including Hashimoto’s, are secondary “downstream” health problems, and thyroid function cannot be resolved in isolation, or apart from an environmental context.

The thyroid gland itself is primarily a fatty tissue that, like breast tissue, or the heart and pancreatic organs, becomes a good storage site for toxic waste. Whether it’s mercury toxicity or another type of toxic exposure (radiation, pesticide, heavy metals, pharmaceutical, and so on) the thyroid is a particularly vulnerable gland for storing and removing toxins out of the bloodstream. One theory about the alarming rise in autoimmune disease, Hashimoto’s in this case, is that the thyroid has become so toxic that the body “turns against” it and attacks the thyroid itself.

Another upstream cause for poor thyroid function is oxidative stress. The terms oxidative stress and free radicals have become familiar in recent years. Think of oxidative stress as the total burden placed on the thyroid by the constant production of free radicals. It’s like rust. And free radicals are the incremental changes that lead to rust. Another way to say this is that the human body is in constant battle to keep from aging. Research suggests that free radical damage to cells leads to the pathological changes associated with aging.

To halt this process, the thyroid will slow down to preserve itself, to protect its own mitochondria and cell membranes. It will conserve energy by slowing down. Remember, every single cell in your body is a self-contained living organism that wants to thrive. When you eat a diet loaded with antioxidants you are preventing further oxidative stress by cleaning up free radicals. This is how a pomegranate can help fix your hypothyroidism.

Lastly, the effects of brain chemistry on thyroid function should not be overlooked. A doctor cannot properly evaluate thyroid function without considering the brain, which is saturated with thyroid hormone receptor sites. Is it any wonder that low thyroid function causes mental fogginess, low productivity, and forgetfulness? People are discovering the therapeutic power of amino acids, herbs and nutrients that support the brain’s neurotransmitters. We’re increasingly understanding how the factors that lead to poor thyroid health—bad diet, unstable blood sugar control, adrenal stress and gut infections—also lead to poor brain health, including brain tissue inflammation and degeneration, and a deficiency in neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Low Thyroid Hormones Cause Unwanted Suffering

Statistics indicate that 27 million otherwise healthy people suffer with thyroid hormone disorders. Thyroid hormones are metabolic hormones, meaning that they are your energy-producing hormones. The 70+ trillion cells in your body require energy, and all are affected by thyroid function. The failure to meet this energy requirement affects every organ and system in your body, including the brain, which requires over 20% of the total energy demand.

Low thyroid function is a big deal, and this is why thyroid problems are not isolated problems. Think of the thyroid gland as the gas pedal – the feature that allows you to produce energy at the cellular level and function throughout the day. When the thyroid fails, you do too. When you suffer with anxiety or depression, you must look at the thyroid. High cholesterol, digestive problems and diabetes? Think thyroid. Obvious symptoms can include brain fog, constipation, insomnia, weight gain, fatigue, hair loss, dry skin, brittle nails, chronic pain and more. Extreme cases can be debilitating.

The standard of care, medically speaking, for anyone with low thyroid is to prescribe replacement hormones forever and to monitor the results periodically, usually every six months, and adjust the dosage accordingly. For a minority of patients this is sufficient, but for most, it is not. This is because, while the hormone-replacement model might make your labs look normal, it does not allow you to feel any better. The labs simply don’t show everything we need to know, and so many people who need help are told they are “fine.”

There is more to thyroid health than what shows up on a lab. What’s causing the thyroid to fail in the first place? No amount of hormone replacement will fix that, and so the problems will continue.

We live in a toxic world where the ability to maintain healthy thyroid function is crucial. Most doctors aren’t trained to think about the underlying causes of disease, such as toxic build up, microbes, poor fuel delivery, nutrition, the ability to detoxify and eliminate waste, blood sugar management, etc. From a functional medicine perspective, a good way to understand low thyroid function is to view it as a downstream problem, part of a whole health approach. Ruling out autoimmunity is step one, followed by a complete workup to assess hormone and nutrient status, gut barrier integrity, detoxification and waste elimination capabilities, liver function, infection, brain fitness and so on. There’s a lot to do. Get started!

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Freeing Yourself of the Standard Model of Treatment for Thyroid Hormones

It is widely understood throughout the medical community that low thyroid function is always secondary to something else, but they never consider the possibility (even likelihood) of it being caused by an autoimmune attack, i.e. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. This is when the thyroid becomes so toxic the body attacks it.

Patients are considered to be managed and treated properly when the TSH normalizes. But all that means is that the TSH is managed, while the underlying mechanism for low thyroid function (the autoimmune attack) is not. In many instances a doctor will even refuse to run thyroid antibodies, because most doctors don’t understand the underlying issue and so don’t see the point.

In conventional medicine, or what I call The Replacement Model, a drug, or in this case a hormone, is meant to replace actual physiology. Any symptoms that remain after the normalization of the TSH marker are attributed to some other cause. In other words, the prevailing medical thinking is that since the TSH reads as “normal” on your lab report, or outside the laboratory range for prescribing medicine, your symptoms are resolved, and the drug you are taking has worked as a perfect replacement for actual thyroid hormone. If your symptoms have not in fact resolved, they must be because of something else, because look, your labs are normal!

This kind of circular thinking is chronic in the medical community.

For example, if your TSH levels are “normal,” but you are still experiencing depression, then your medical doctor or psychiatrist will give you antidepressants. Never mind that depression and hypothyroid issues are often linked.

If you haven’t had this kind of experience yet, you probably will. You will go into your doctor’s office because you STILL suffer with the same symptoms, and in an attempt to move you out of the office in the allotted 10 minutes for your visit, your doctor is going to shove an anti-depressant prescription at you, and tell you that it will help alleviate some of the symptoms, implying that it’s all in your head.
In most cases, since the actual autoimmune response is ignored, over time you will continue to lose more thyroid activity. This is what most of you suffer from. And as the requirements for your thyroid replacement hormone prescription continue to rise, you will continue to have symptoms and be ignored.
Something else needs to be done. Get your thyroid checked properly, and get it healed, not just “managed.”

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Does Depression Always Require Taking Dangerous Prescription Drugs?

Prolonged periods of depression or constantly feeling like you’re sad every day impacts every avenue of your life; in fact, it can even impact your physical health. The connection between your emotions and your health is more powerful than you may think – whether temporary or long-term, depression can manifest in physical pain, illness, or chronic conditions. And all of these can take a toll on even more areas of your life, from hobbies and recreational activities to your social life and career.

Why Prescription Medications Don’t Work

Most people who experience depression, sadness or a roller coaster ride of emotions are often referred to a mental health professional, who usually prescribes one or more anti-depressants. Because they’re so commonly prescribed and heavily advertised, you’ll recognize some of the names: Paxil, Zoloft, Prozac, Cymbalta, and many others. These powerful, sometimes addictive medications can cause dangerous side effects like attempts/thoughts of suicide, heart problems, birth defects, violent/aggressive behavior, anxiety, delusional thinking and more including, ironically, worsening depression.

If you experience any of these side effects, you can’t just stop taking the medication, you need to be weaned off it under the supervision of your doctor, and sometimes it takes more than one attempt. Unfortunately, some doctors prescribe another medication to counteract the effects of the first one, and this is how the vicious cycle begins of escalating symptoms causing an increased number of prescription drugs that in turn cause new sets of symptoms. And on and on it goes.

The upshot is that these medications don’t fix what’s really causing the problem, they only mask the symptoms, and sometimes only for a limited time. At that point the dosage may be increased or a new medication may be added.

Finding the Root Cause

It’s usually at the point where a patient is taking too many medications and suffering too many ill effects that they come to me. Rather than covering up symptoms with medications, I look for the root cause, which is neurological and/or inflammation based. Depression is a symptom of an underlying problem, not a final diagnosis that points directly to the frontal lobe of the brain – it’s either unhealthy or not firing properly. This occurs due to inflammation, which can be caused by a number of different things, from blood sugar levels to food sensitivities.

“Medications for depression don’t fix the root cause of the problem.”

Mental health professionals usually consider the cause of depression to be chemical imbalances, and the medications they prescribe are chemicals that maneuver the brain’s neurotransmitters. Because these drugs don’t address the fundamental reason for depression, they’re constantly being altered, changed, or added to.

“It’s All in Your Head”

What I see a lot in my practice is that when people with chronic illness (particularly hormonal imbalances and thyroid issues) tell their doctors that they’re experiencing depression, they’re told “it’s all in your head.” They’re then prescribed anti-depressants or anti-anxiety medications in an attempt to alleviate depression, anxiety or mood swings.

But it doesn’t stop there. A patient, who had most of her thyroid removed many years ago, recently told me that she’s been taking a thyroid medication for some time, but it’s no longer working as it had. When she told her doctor this, he dismissed what she was experiencing, saying, “That can’t be right. It must be in your head.” Essentially, he was telling her that both the changes she experienced and her perception of them was nothing more than psychological.

It’s easy to understand how depression can really take hold after hearing something like this; if the patient isn’t already depressed, they can become depressed because they feel trapped, with nowhere to turn to for help and no hope of improvement.

These aren’t unusual stories. I hear the same thing all the time – doctors telling their patients that they’re crazy rather than taking the time and effort to look deeper, beyond the symptom, for the actual cause of the problem.

In my opinion, no patient’s complaints should be ignored or dismissed; one of the most important things a doctor can do is listen carefully to his patients. By performing a comprehensive evaluation of each person’s case, from their past health history to their current symptoms and medications along with other considerations and tests, medications can be reduced or eliminated and the real cause of depression can be treated.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.

Thyroid Disorder Diagnosis? It’s About More Than Your Blood Test Marker

If you’ve been diagnosed with a thyroid disorder, you’re not alone – more than 27 million people are affected nationwide. There are over 30 known thyroid disorders, including hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid, thyroid over-conversion or under-conversion, and more. Medications may help improve your thyroid marker, but they may not actually improve the disorder itself.

The question that needs to be answered is – what’s the underlying cause of my particular thyroid problem? To answer that, we need to take a look beyond the standard blood test thyroid marker and do a deeper analysis of your specific symptoms.

A thyroid disorder isn’t some standardized problem with a one-size-fits-all solution. Because the body and mind are a complex network of interwoven causes and effects, a person’s medical history along with their lifestyle needs to be analyzed in order to discover the underlying and exacerbating issues.

One example of this is a patient of mine who came to me complaining of dry skin, constipation, brain fog and cloudy thinking, all symptoms of a thyroid disorder. He also was affected by long-term poor balance.

In going through his medical records, I discovered a diagnosis from eight years earlier of cerebellar ataxia, an autoimmune attack against the brain that causes balance and coordination problems. His more recent diagnosis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune attack against the thyroid, stems from the same root as cerebellar ataxia – both are the result of an out-of-control immune system that’s attacking the thyroid and brain. He was also plagued by recurring viral infection flare-ups when he worked himself to exhaustion.

By focusing on fixing only the blood marker rather than looking at the bigger picture – the connection between diagnoses and the root causes of the symptoms themselves – progression of the disorder would have continued, even if medications had helped to bring the marker itself back into an acceptable range. Root causes can range from poor gut health to heavy metals in the body; if these issues are not addressed directly, it is possible that not only will diagnosed disorders progress, but new disorders could arise, resulting in yet more medications that can be the cause of new problems.

Find out what you need to know about your thyroid hormone or health disorder diagnosis today, and get health news updates via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and The Wellness Essentials newsletter.

If you’d like to leave a question for me to answer in a future blog, you can do that via social media or email.

For more information about my clinic in Oradell, NJ, including Functional Medicine, Neurology & Nutrition, and The Grassroots Medicine Initiative, please call (201) 261-5430.